Tag: Tinga Tinga

A truly team effort saw staff and students successfully Row the Channel and back in reception last Friday, in a Lower Sixth fundraising drive for Tinga Tinga primary school in Tanzania. Dr Goldsmith thanked all those who supported the achievement: ‘You will be pleased to know that we successfully avoided cross-channel ferries and container ships and made it back to Blighty at 5pm today. We also raised just under £200 for the Row the Channel bit of today’s fundraising! (More to come from Christmas jumper and giraffe money.) This is brilliant news, so thank you very much to all the many staff and students who did their bit to help reach our total of 75,200 metres. Special mention to Mr Kinder and to Mr McLean for rowing 5,000 and 10,000 metres respectively and please pass on thanks to all those who so very generously donated money.’

Congratulations to the Third Form for raising just under £500 for Tinga Tinga, with their ‘In Her Shoes Day’ on Friday; the girls’ ambition to buy a pair of shoes for every child at the Tanzanian primary school is in sight.

Congratulations to the Lower Sixth Form who spearheaded a bake sale during Thursday’s House Sport, raising funds for Tinga Tinga primary school in Tanzania.

Also in support of Tinga Tinga, the Third Form masterminded an ‘In Her Shoes Day’. Pupils from all years contributed £1 – many from their own pocket money – to wear shoes of their choice today; many of the students at Tinga Tinga go bare foot or have ‘shoes’ made from tyres, and the funds raised will go towards buying them comfortable, fitting shoes that will improve their experience of walking to and from school – often an hour each way.

Head of Sociology Mrs Haddock sent a message of thanks to those in the school community ‘who so kindly donated colouring books and pens for the hospital in McKeni, Sierra Leone where my daughter works. All went to good use and gave the patients in the children’s ward much delight in an otherwise bleak situation; not even in the school do they have access to colouring books. It was especially moving to witness Santigie’s first smile in 6 months – after a fall from a mango tree had left him paralysed – when we gave him his presents, although I think the lollipops helped somewhat! Similarly, the gift of baby clothes went some way to give the mother of twins a little hope for the future of her babies – even if she put the boy in a dress because it was blue and the girl in yellow T shirt and shorts. There were so many other children and their parents who benefited and, in a country where many have nothing, your donations made a huge difference. Thank you.’

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Congratulations to the Lower Sixth Form who spearheaded a bake sale during Thursday’s House Sport, raising funds for Tinga Tinga primary school in Tanzania.
Also in support of Tinga Tinga, the Third Form masterminded an ‘In Her Shoes Day’. Pupils from all years contributed £1 – many from their own pocket money – to wear shoes of their choice today; many of the students at Tinga Tinga go bare foot or have ‘shoes’ made from tyres, and the funds raised will go towards buying them comfortable, fitting shoes that will improve their experience of walking to and from school – often an hour each way.

Head of Sociology Mrs Haddock sent a message of thanks to those in the school community ‘who so kindly donated colouring books and pens for the hospital in McKeni, Sierra Leone where my daughter works. All went to good use and gave the patients in the children’s ward much delight in an otherwise bleak situation; not even in the school do they have access to colouring books. It was especially moving to witness Santigie’s first smile in 6 months – after a fall from a mango tree had left him paralysed – when we gave him his presents, although I think the lollipops helped somewhat! Similarly, the gift of baby clothes went some way to give the mother of twins a little hope for the future of her babies – even if she put the boy in a dress because it was blue and the girl in yellow T shirt and shorts. There were so many other children and their parents who benefited and, in a country where many have nothing, your donations made a huge difference. Thank you.’